In 2006, the EU introduced the F gas Regulation. This regulation applies to five main industry sectors:

  • Stationary refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pumps
  • Fire protection systems and fire extinguishers
  • Mobile air conditioning
  • High voltage switchgear
  • Solvents

 

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F gases) are powerful greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming if released into the atmosphere. HFCs are the most common type of F gases and are mainly used as the refrigerant in air conditioning and commercial refrigeration systems. The F-Gas Regulations are EU legislation designed to strictly limit the release of F-gases into the atmosphere. By law, all air conditioning systems (a system is defined as a closed circuit) containing over 3kg of F-Gas refrigerant must be checked for damage and leaks at least once per year by an F-Gas certified contractor.

 

Owners and operators of Refrigeration, Air Conditioning and Heat Pumps are required under F-GAS Legislation to ensure certain obligations are met:

  • Repair leaks found as soon as possible
  • Use technical means that are not disproportionately costly to prevent leakage of refrigerant
  • Recover and dispose of refrigerant  appropriately
  • Use qualified contractors to service, maintain and ensure the appropriate handling of refrigerants.

 

For systems over 3kg of F-GAS there are a few additional requirements such as:

  • Detailed records must be kept detailing how much refrigerant is in a system, type of refrigerant, refrigerant added/recovered and disposed of, name of company responsible for servicing/maintenance, person responsible for the system and dates of the last leak check.
  • The above checks must be carried out by a qualified engineer at least annually.
  • System above 30kG must be checked every 6 months but quarterly is preferred.

 

As part of our service package we ensure all Air Conditioning systems within the service plan are F-GAS compliant, we provide an F-GAS log for every system and leave it for your onsite records.